The Troubadour, West Hollywood 90069Report Issue

The Troubadour, West Hollywood 90069


9081 Santa Monica Blvd
West Hollywood, California 90069
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Next Show

Thu, January 30, 2020 (8:00 PM PST)
City Of The Sun with Kiltro


City Of The Sun

THE EXPERIENTIAL MUSIC OF CITY OF THE SUN IS THE SOUND YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU WERE MISSING. NYC’S POWERHOUSE TRIO FLIP THE PERCEPTION OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, ATTRACTING A WHOLE NEW GENERATION TO THE GENRE. Formed in 2011, City of the Sun features guitarists John Pita, Avi Snow, and percussionist Zach Para. The band’s sound has an array of influences including indie rock, American folk, flamenco, and blues; it’s been called worldly, cinematic, a mix between Rodrigo y Gabriela and Explosions in the Sky.

9081 Santa Monica Blvd, West Hollywood, CA 90069 
Adv Tix $15.00 / DOS Tix $17.00

Upcoming Shows

Thu, January 30, 2020 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PST )
City Of The Sun with Kiltro
City Of The Sun

THE EXPERIENTIAL MUSIC OF CITY OF THE SUN IS THE SOUND YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU WERE MISSING. NYC’S POWERHOUSE TRIO FLIP THE PERCEPTION OF INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, ATTRACTING A WHOLE NEW GENERATION TO THE GENRE. Formed in 2011, City of the Sun features guitarists John Pita, Avi Snow, and percussionist Zach Para. The band’s sound has an array of influences including indie rock, American folk, flamenco, and blues; it’s been called worldly, cinematic, a mix between Rodrigo y Gabriela and Explosions in the Sky.

Adv Tix $15.00 / DOS Tix $17.00
Wed, February 5, 2020 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PST )
Radical Face
Radical Face

"Hello, Hope, it's been a while," go the opening lines of "Dead Ends", the centerpiece of Ben Cooper's latest EP as Radical Face. Over the eight years he put into the three-part The Family Tree series -- The Roots (2011), The Branches (2013), and The Leaves (2016) -- he'd grasped onto ideas and perceptions that left him hopelessly drained, creatively and emotionally. Speaking with a professional finally enabled him to let go, something he's honored by naming his new effort Therapy. With The Family Tree, Cooper sought to confront his difficult upbringing in Florida by forming a fictional genealogy paired with stirring folk arrangements. Intense family drama near the end of the process pushed The Leaves to take on a far more personal tone, as Cooper felt "dishonest… putting it into a separate avatar." That only made the songs increasingly more difficult to perform, however, which coupled with the artistic exhaustion of pairing music with his grand concept made him pine for palliation. In an attempt to test himself and move on from the compositional confines of that trilogy, Cooper undertook a number of different projects. There was his Missing Film instrumental album, a score he released for filmmakers to use for free, and his Covers, Vol. 1 EP, in which he only sang songs by female artists. Adding to the challenge was his relocation to California; moving away from his studio in Florida forced him to relearn how to record in an apartment with minimal tools. But Cooper as says, "If you wait for ideal conditions, you'll never get anything done." Singing the songs of Lana Del Rey and Cyndi Lauper reconnected him to traditional structures, while watching the Boom Boom Room performances on Twin Peaks: The Return and revisiting Talking Heads inspired him to seek richer, vaster orchestrations. His desire to leave the acoustic leanings of his past works behind and return to verse-chorus framework became the drive for the sonic shifts on Therapy. This time, he focused on creating the production first and "letting the content work itself back in." The Family Tree had been the opposite, a template that had grown to stifle his songwriting. Of course, it was finding that lyrical content that became the struggle -- until therapy gutted him. Weekly sessions helped him realize the portrait he'd created in The Family Tree was masking the hard truth: "There's no real positive there," as Cooper puts it. While he's proud of the work he did on the trilogy, he looks at it differently now that it's in the rearview. "I don't regret it, but it wasn't what I thought. I thought I was telling a different story, immortalizing the strange into something beneficial rather than just dysfunction." Stripped of any previous conception of self, Cooper was left empty -- which is a good place to start. "Psychologically when we first let go of something, there's a void, and a void is a notice of an absence," he posits. "But then absence can turn to space, and space you can start filling it with things." Though filling that space has only just begun, he's embracing the beautiful rawness on Therapy. "You gotta learn how to take your hits when your hands are always tied/ And no, I'm not well, but I'm alright," goes the quietly determined hook on "Hard of Hearing". Cooper soothes his own worries on "Better Days" as he coos, "Try to remind yourself/ That it's probably gonna take some time/ But there are better days to find." "And I don't wanna know why/ I just want to know how to move on now," he sings on the uplifting "Dead Ends". "The past is buried in time/ And the future's an anxious invention." Approaching songwriting from this painfully achieved mindfulness has opened Cooper up to fresh understandings. "Looking back, it's like letting go. Mourning concepts, in a way," he explains. "Sometimes you have a narrative, it's an idea, a projection you see for yourself. Sometimes, you're able to understand that that's just some picture, you would never be that thing. It's letting go of the narrative." On Therapy, Radical Face has let go of all his past narratives. Instead of an intricate saga, he's kept his parameters simple. Instead of his troubled past, he's focused on his scarred present. Instead of acoustic folk, he's written lush compositions. Unsure yet confident, battered yet resilient, Cooper is taking Radical Face in a poignant new direction -- towards hope.

Adv Tix $30.00 / DOS tix $32.00
Thu, February 6, 2020 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PST )
Radical Face
Radical Face

"Hello, Hope, it's been a while," go the opening lines of "Dead Ends", the centerpiece of Ben Cooper's latest EP as Radical Face. Over the eight years he put into the three-part The Family Tree series -- The Roots (2011), The Branches (2013), and The Leaves (2016) -- he'd grasped onto ideas and perceptions that left him hopelessly drained, creatively and emotionally. Speaking with a professional finally enabled him to let go, something he's honored by naming his new effort Therapy. With The Family Tree, Cooper sought to confront his difficult upbringing in Florida by forming a fictional genealogy paired with stirring folk arrangements. Intense family drama near the end of the process pushed The Leaves to take on a far more personal tone, as Cooper felt "dishonest… putting it into a separate avatar." That only made the songs increasingly more difficult to perform, however, which coupled with the artistic exhaustion of pairing music with his grand concept made him pine for palliation. In an attempt to test himself and move on from the compositional confines of that trilogy, Cooper undertook a number of different projects. There was his Missing Film instrumental album, a score he released for filmmakers to use for free, and his Covers, Vol. 1 EP, in which he only sang songs by female artists. Adding to the challenge was his relocation to California; moving away from his studio in Florida forced him to relearn how to record in an apartment with minimal tools. But Cooper as says, "If you wait for ideal conditions, you'll never get anything done." Singing the songs of Lana Del Rey and Cyndi Lauper reconnected him to traditional structures, while watching the Boom Boom Room performances on Twin Peaks: The Return and revisiting Talking Heads inspired him to seek richer, vaster orchestrations. His desire to leave the acoustic leanings of his past works behind and return to verse-chorus framework became the drive for the sonic shifts on Therapy. This time, he focused on creating the production first and "letting the content work itself back in." The Family Tree had been the opposite, a template that had grown to stifle his songwriting. Of course, it was finding that lyrical content that became the struggle -- until therapy gutted him. Weekly sessions helped him realize the portrait he'd created in The Family Tree was masking the hard truth: "There's no real positive there," as Cooper puts it. While he's proud of the work he did on the trilogy, he looks at it differently now that it's in the rearview. "I don't regret it, but it wasn't what I thought. I thought I was telling a different story, immortalizing the strange into something beneficial rather than just dysfunction." Stripped of any previous conception of self, Cooper was left empty -- which is a good place to start. "Psychologically when we first let go of something, there's a void, and a void is a notice of an absence," he posits. "But then absence can turn to space, and space you can start filling it with things." Though filling that space has only just begun, he's embracing the beautiful rawness on Therapy. "You gotta learn how to take your hits when your hands are always tied/ And no, I'm not well, but I'm alright," goes the quietly determined hook on "Hard of Hearing". Cooper soothes his own worries on "Better Days" as he coos, "Try to remind yourself/ That it's probably gonna take some time/ But there are better days to find." "And I don't wanna know why/ I just want to know how to move on now," he sings on the uplifting "Dead Ends". "The past is buried in time/ And the future's an anxious invention." Approaching songwriting from this painfully achieved mindfulness has opened Cooper up to fresh understandings. "Looking back, it's like letting go. Mourning concepts, in a way," he explains. "Sometimes you have a narrative, it's an idea, a projection you see for yourself. Sometimes, you're able to understand that that's just some picture, you would never be that thing. It's letting go of the narrative." On Therapy, Radical Face has let go of all his past narratives. Instead of an intricate saga, he's kept his parameters simple. Instead of his troubled past, he's focused on his scarred present. Instead of acoustic folk, he's written lush compositions. Unsure yet confident, battered yet resilient, Cooper is taking Radical Face in a poignant new direction -- towards hope.

Adv Tix $30.00 / DOS tix $32.00
Fri, February 7, 2020 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PST )
Pigeons Playing Ping Pong with Goose
Pigeons Playing Ping Pong

In the past two years alone, psych-funk trailblazers Pigeons Playing Ping Pong have co-billed at Red Rocks, played halftime at Madison Square Garden, performed on Adult Swim’s FishCenter Live, celebrated the tenth anniversary of their beloved Domefest, and even earned their first headline arena show. What’s the secret to their success? Let’s just call it “bird of mouth.” “Our fans call themselves The Flock,” says guitarist/vocalist Greg Ormont, “and they’ve created one of the biggest, most active fan communities on the internet. Everything we do is for them, so it’s been unbelievably rewarding to watch them grow with us on this amazing journey.” Hailed as “musical explorers” by Rolling Stone, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong first took flight roughly a decade ago at the University of Maryland, and the band has since gone on to play more than a thousand shows across 44 states. Fueled by a relentless work ethic and an ecstatic sound, the fun-loving four-piece built their reputation on epic, blissed-out concerts blending infectious funk grooves with psychedelic jams and intoxicating energy. Glide called them “a band that melts faces and pulls no punches,” while Relix praised the group as “joyous” and “dance-worthy,” and Jambase described them simply as a “powerhouse.” Acting as their own independent label, the Baltimore-based quartet has released four studio albums (including their widely-acclaimed 2017 record, Pizazz) and racked up more than twenty million streams on Spotify. They’ve quickly become festival favorites, too, performing everywhere from Bonnaroo to Electric Forest to Jazz Fest and welcoming top-tier sit-ins along the way from Marcus King and Karl Denson along with members of Vulfpeck, The Revivalists, Umphrey's McGee and The String Cheese Incident among others. This fall, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong—Ormont, fellow guitarist Jeremy Schon, bassist Ben Carrey, and drummer Alex “Gator” Petropulos—will return to the road for some of their biggest headline shows yet in the run-up to their New Year’s Eve extravaganza at ExploreAsheville.com Arena in North Carolina. “I think everything boils down to the live show for us,” says Ormont. “We really don’t hold back when it comes to sharing how happy and excited we are to be onstage, and that lets the audience know that it’s okay to show how much fun they’re having, too. We embrace the excitement and enthusiasm of our live concert experience with hopes of generating the kind of positivity we wish to see in the world all the time.” When they’re not on the road, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong can almost always be found in their practice space or in the studio, writing and recording a near-constant flow of fresh material. The band’s explosive new single, “King Kong,” offers a sneak peek of what they’ve been up to lately, with lightspeed guitar work and funky horns anchored by a rock-solid rhythm section and wry, playful lyrics. It’s a big, bold sound for a band going big, bold places. “We started doing this for fun in a college dorm room,” reflects Ormont. “Now we get to do it for fun in theaters and arenas across the country!” Who knows where the fun will lead next? For Pigeons Playing Ping Pong and their Flock, the sky’s the limit.

Adv Tix $23.50/ DOS Tix $28.50/ 2-Day Passes $42.00
Fri, February 7, 2020 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PST )
Pigeons Playing Ping Pong - 2 NIGHT PASS
Pigeons Playing Ping Pong - 2 NIGHT PASS Tix $42.00
Sat, February 8, 2020 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PST )
Pigeons Playing Ping Pong with Goose
Pigeons Playing Ping Pong

In the past two years alone, psych-funk trailblazers Pigeons Playing Ping Pong have co-billed at Red Rocks, played halftime at Madison Square Garden, performed on Adult Swim’s FishCenter Live, celebrated the tenth anniversary of their beloved Domefest, and even earned their first headline arena show. What’s the secret to their success? Let’s just call it “bird of mouth.” “Our fans call themselves The Flock,” says guitarist/vocalist Greg Ormont, “and they’ve created one of the biggest, most active fan communities on the internet. Everything we do is for them, so it’s been unbelievably rewarding to watch them grow with us on this amazing journey.” Hailed as “musical explorers” by Rolling Stone, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong first took flight roughly a decade ago at the University of Maryland, and the band has since gone on to play more than a thousand shows across 44 states. Fueled by a relentless work ethic and an ecstatic sound, the fun-loving four-piece built their reputation on epic, blissed-out concerts blending infectious funk grooves with psychedelic jams and intoxicating energy. Glide called them “a band that melts faces and pulls no punches,” while Relix praised the group as “joyous” and “dance-worthy,” and Jambase described them simply as a “powerhouse.” Acting as their own independent label, the Baltimore-based quartet has released four studio albums (including their widely-acclaimed 2017 record, Pizazz) and racked up more than twenty million streams on Spotify. They’ve quickly become festival favorites, too, performing everywhere from Bonnaroo to Electric Forest to Jazz Fest and welcoming top-tier sit-ins along the way from Marcus King and Karl Denson along with members of Vulfpeck, The Revivalists, Umphrey's McGee and The String Cheese Incident among others. This fall, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong—Ormont, fellow guitarist Jeremy Schon, bassist Ben Carrey, and drummer Alex “Gator” Petropulos—will return to the road for some of their biggest headline shows yet in the run-up to their New Year’s Eve extravaganza at ExploreAsheville.com Arena in North Carolina. “I think everything boils down to the live show for us,” says Ormont. “We really don’t hold back when it comes to sharing how happy and excited we are to be onstage, and that lets the audience know that it’s okay to show how much fun they’re having, too. We embrace the excitement and enthusiasm of our live concert experience with hopes of generating the kind of positivity we wish to see in the world all the time.” When they’re not on the road, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong can almost always be found in their practice space or in the studio, writing and recording a near-constant flow of fresh material. The band’s explosive new single, “King Kong,” offers a sneak peek of what they’ve been up to lately, with lightspeed guitar work and funky horns anchored by a rock-solid rhythm section and wry, playful lyrics. It’s a big, bold sound for a band going big, bold places. “We started doing this for fun in a college dorm room,” reflects Ormont. “Now we get to do it for fun in theaters and arenas across the country!” Who knows where the fun will lead next? For Pigeons Playing Ping Pong and their Flock, the sky’s the limit.

Adv Tix $23.50/ DOS Tix $28.50/ 2-Day Passes $42.00
Mon, February 10, 2020 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PST )
CalArts Soundstream 2020
CalArts Soundstream 2020
Tue, February 11, 2020 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PST )
Nightly with The WLDFE, Sawyer
Nightly

The music of Nashville band Nightly is made for moody introspection, for late-night daydreaming or driving with no real destination in mind. With their heart-on-sleeve lyrics and impassioned brand of alt-pop, each track feels as private as a secret and cathartic as confession. And in their sing-along-heavy live show—a highly visual event that adds new color and detail to the Nightly aesthetic—those songs take on a strangely unifying power, turning personal heartache into a shared experience. On Nightly’s forthcoming third EP, singer Jonathan Capeci, guitarist Joey Beretta, and drummer Nicholas Sainato build off the dreamy urgency first glimpsed in their 2016 breakthrough hit “xo.” But while Nightly mostly created their first two EPs in bedrooms and home studios, their latest effort was recorded at the legendary House of Blues Studios in Nashville—a world-class facility that pushed the band toward a more fully realized and unpredictable sound than ever before. On the EP’s lead single “No Call, No Reply,” Nightly bring their more finely honed vision to an unrequited-love song that’s cinematic in scope. Conceived as a sister song to “No Vacancy”—a cut from their 2016 EP Honest—the track mirrors its predecessor’s arpeggiated synth pattern but finds Capeci’s soulful vocals perfectly channeling the pain of romantic angst. “‘No Vacancy’ was about not being in the right mental space to dedicate the time that a relationship requires, but this song is about me being on the other end of that experience, and sort of hung out to dry,” says Capeci. At the same time, “No Call, No Reply” reveals the band’s experimental side in its unearthly vocal effects. “Usually when we’re writing a song, I like to freestyle melodies until I land on something I like,” says Capeci. “We ended up leaving those freestyles in for this song and Auto-Tuning them, which gave it a different feeling.” On “Twenty Something,” meanwhile, Nightly shift into a much brighter and more hopeful mood. “A lot of our songs are about love lost, but this song’s more about sticking with someone through hard times, and how the things that connect us are stronger than the things that can tear us apart,” says Capeci. Opening on a moment of stark intensity, “Twenty Something” ultimately turns epic, unfolding in sprawling guitar tones, luminous textures, and flashes of delicate falsetto. In co-producing the EP with their longtime collaborator Keith Varon, Nightly instilled their songs with a sonic depth the band partly attributes to their more grandiose recording environment. With several of the tracks written in the studio, they also tapped into their powerful chemistry while pursuing a more deliberate approach to songcraft. “These songs came from us all being in the room together and figuring out the vibe, and from there I’d go sit down at this grand piano and really concentrate on what I wanted to say with the song,” says Capeci. “I think it helps create something stronger if you strip away all the other elements, and just completely focus on lyrics and melody.” As Capeci points out, Nightly have long brought a certain contemplative quality to their creative process. “With songs we’ve done in the past, I’d go up to the rooftop of our apartment complex and sort of pace around singing stuff into my phone, writing down the lines as they came to me,” he notes. Formed as a duo in 2015, Nightly initially sprang from a near-lifelong musical partnership between Capeci and Beretta—Pennsylvania-bred cousins who bought matching Fender Squier Stratocasters as kids. Soon after moving to Nashville, the two came up with “xo” and uploaded the bittersweet breakup anthem to their SoundCloud page. “We figured that, as a no-name band putting something out on our own, it would be a huge feat to get 100,000 plays in a month,” Capeci recalls. Instead, “xo” surpassed that number nearly overnight and hit a million plays within weeks. In addition to earning massive attention online, the song quickly led to Nightly’s signing with Interscope Records. Along with releasing Honest and their 2018 sophomore EP The Sound of Your Voice, Nightly have spent much of the past few years on the road, touring with artists like The Night Game, The Struts, and K.Flay as well as completing their first-ever headlining tour and making their debut appearances in the U.K. True to their DIY sensibilities, the band recently collaborated with an artist friend to create a series of videos specifically tailored to accompany each song in their live set, an element they debuted on their headlining run. “It’s really exciting that the first time a lot of our fans get to see us live, they’re experiencing the show exactly the way we envisioned it,” says Capeci. With their name translating as ’night, love you in textspeak, Nightly continually achieve an undeniable intimacy with the crowd, and make a point of meeting with audience members after every show. Often leaving the venue with gifts of flowers and artwork lovingly made by their fans, the band sees that kinship as an extension of the emotional exchange at the heart of their music. “At one show a while ago, there was a kid who told us how—even though how there’s a sad feeling to a lot of our songs—there’s something about them that’s healing,” says Capeci. “That was such a cool thing to hear, because making music’s like therapy to me. We just try to write about things that are real to us, and it means so much to know that could somehow help other people with whatever they’re going through in their own lives.”


Wed, February 12, 2020 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PST )
The Lone Bellow with Bellsaint
The Lone Bellow: Half Moon Light Tour
Thu, February 13, 2020 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PST )
The Lone Bellow with Laura Jean Anderson
The Lone Bellow: Half Moon Light Tour
Sat, February 15, 2020 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PST )
ALO with Ben Morrison (of The Brothers Comatose)
ALO

ALO is more than a band. It’s a musical relationship that has endured for over two decades, with band members playing in numerous projects together and apart. Following the 2012 release of their freewheeling Sounds Like This, the band took time off to work on various side projects. Zach Gill (keys/vocals) toured the world with the band’s college pal Jack Johnson; Dan “Lebo” Lebowitz (guitar/vocals) played shows with the Grateful Dead’s Phil Lesh; Steve Adams (bass/vocals) toured and recorded with Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers; Dave Brogan (drums/vocals) joined up with Utah band, Mokie. These and other endeavors have influenced the band’s new album Tangle Of Time. More than previous releases, Tangle Of Time really taps into what makes ALO unique. It’s that special blend of classic songwriting and the ability to stretch out jams and distill dance floor grooves. It's heartfelt lyrics that make you smile, reflect and just want to sing along either way. It's four great musicians who all write and sing. And four friends who've been through a lot together and still support, challenge and inspire one another. Entering Allegiant Records in San Anselmo, California this past January with co-producer Dave Simon-Baker, the four members decided they’d take a different recording approach. Instead of spending pre-production days jamming and co-writing, each member brought in their own demos, roughly three dozen in total, for the group to listen to, pick apart and eventually whittle down to the 11 songs that make up Tangle Of Time. Once they narrowed their focus, they turned their attention to arrangements and production techniques. Songs were tightened up, layers made more experimental and the end results validated their new approach. Lebo described the shared respect and admiration the band felt during the recording process this way: "There are four strong opinions in the room, but playing together for so long we've all become pretty good at the empathy thing at this point; we can be very Zen about it. We truly value being together at this point in our careers, and whatever we get from our solo and side gigs, no matter how much fun we have, it's not this." That sort of maturity, the ability to take stock of your friends, loved ones, and collaborators, and truly appreciate them is certainly one of the cornerstones of Tangle Of Time. Lebo, Adams and Gill first started playing music together in middle school, and then with Brogan right after college. Somehow, these relationships have lasted, evolved and been made stronger every year. One can almost hear the group releasing a satisfied existential sigh throughout the album, finding acceptance, love and contentment with the world they've built. "I really appreciate the guys right now, more so than ever," Gill shared, excitedly adding, "Years ago the feeling was, 'I wanna get to my songs and see how they sound while we're all here', whereas now I'm rooting for everyone else's songs. It's great." That approach of supporting each other’s songs worked like a charm, capturing each member’s distinct songwriting voice, while simultaneously expanding the notion of what an ALO song or album can be. Take for instance the one-two-punch of the synth-filled, spacey jam vehicle "The Ticket" and the pedal steel-driven easy-going happiness of "Simple Times". Although two ends of the sonic spectrum, both are classic Gill songs at their core but stretched wide and far by the band’s collective effort. Not to be outdone, Lebo's guitar epic "Undertow" is a song that practically begs to be stretched out live, with its swirling double guitar outro intoxicating the listener to such a degree that you might find yourself on the band's website, dreamily purchasing tickets for an entire run of shows just to see where the song ventures live. Lebo pairs this with "Push", a jaunty yet thoughtful number with a playful guitar riff that's basically the musical equivalent of joy. "Not Old Yet" and "Keep On", Adams’ contributions to the album, are also touchstones to the spirit of Tangle Of Time. The first is a light-hearted romp about keeping a positive perspective on life’s long road of hurdles and surprises, while the second is an upbeat, forward-thinking sing-along with lines that could be the album's mantra: "Wherever this takes us, I know/That we've got each other, we've still got a long way to go." Brogan's "Coast To Coast" is among the most intriguing songs on the record. He, along with co-writer buddy Ben Malan, came up with a layer-upon-layer soundscape consisting of beautifully esoteric textures. The funky but ominous track tells the surreal tale of a band on the run, with more ideas and energy than know-how. Brogan shared that the theme of “tangled time” materialized unexpectedly over the course of the sessions, elaborating: "There's a point where there is more behind you than ahead of you, and you realize that time becomes a limiting factor." Put the record on your turntable, and you can clearly hear the band’s excitement to get back on the road and explore these songs with their audience. Improvisation is a staple of what the band does, and as Adams stated: "Being in that unknown is such a great life lesson beyond just the music. For all the careful planning and preparing we do, being in the moment is really when it all matters." The band is also planning new ways to expand the theatrical shenanigans that have become a fantastic complement to the live show. From confetti canons to 12-foot beach balls, pre-show skits to elaborate theme nights, bubble suits to a laser-shooting ukulele (yes, really)... ALO is always on the hunt for new and exciting ways to interact with fans to make their shows truly special. Gill, the band's head prankster, put it this way: "I want people to come to a show expecting to be engaged in a fun and creative way. When I see someone dancing or singing along or reaching out to hit a giant beach ball, I start playing to the dancer and at that point, it's really a circle of energy traveling back and forth from the stage. The larger theatrical concepts are ways of interacting with the audience on another level." On Tangle Of Time the band has reached that other level, and are ready to bring everyone along.

Adv Tix $22.00/ DOS Tix $25.00
Tue, February 18, 2020 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PST )
Iyla
Iyla Adv Tix $15.00 / DOS Tix $18.00