The Moroccan Lounge, Los Angeles 90012Report Issue

The Moroccan Lounge, Los Angeles 90012


901 E 1st St
Los Angeles, California 90012
View on Map


Next Show

Tue, April 23, 2019 (8:00 PM PDT)
Flock Of Dimes, Madeline Kenney


Flock Of Dimes / Madeline Kenney
901 E 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90012 
$15.00

Upcoming Shows

Tue, April 23, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PDT )
Flock Of Dimes, Madeline Kenney
Flock Of Dimes / Madeline Kenney $15.00
Wed, April 24, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Old Sea Brigade with Jon Bryant, JONI
Old Sea Brigade

It really feels like coloring outside of the lines. For as much as the music of Old Sea Brigade remains rooted in Americana, indie, country, rock, and ambient soundscapes, it blurs and breaks barriers, tossing and turning between analog cinematic flourishes and provocative lyricism based on hard-won wisdom. Amidst this mélange of textures, Atlanta-born and Nashville-based singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Ben Cramer allows the emotion to resound loudest on his full-length debut, Ode To A Friend [Nettwerk]. “I tried to put myself into my own bubble,” he explains. “I chose to do something that felt like me. It’s the best representation of my songwriting and what I grew up loving about music. I hope you can pull your own meaning from it.” He’s been encouraging audiences to do just that since first emerging in 2015. After the breakup of his last band, he wound up back in Atlanta at his parents’ house with “no idea what to do.” So, he figured it out. The artist combed through his personal sonic archives, found inspiration, and started feverishly writing. Soon after, he teamed up with producer Jeremy Griffith to record Old Sea Brigade’s self-titled debut EP. The single “Love Brought Weight” caught fire, generating over 16 million Spotify streams. In the meantime, he inked a deal with NETTWERK after founder Terry McBride personally reached out on Facebook. Between touring alongside Joseph, Luke Sital Singh, Lewis Watson, Julien Baker, John Paul White, and more, he released 2017’s Cover My Own EP. The lead single “Tidal Wave” quickly crossed the two-million-mark on Spotify as acclaim came from Clash, Indie Obsessive, Immersive Atlanta, and many others. During 2017, he retreated to Griffith’s Destin, FL studio in order to record what would become Ode To A Friend. In the studio, the sonic palette expanded to incorporate analog synths and a “squeaky, old, and out-of-tune piano that you’d never find in a music store—but gave the sound character.” “This go-around, I brought in a lot of production ideas, since I’d been working with many artists in Nashville,” he explains. “I worked closely with Jeremy to bring the production to life. We went outside of the box and tried different things. That noisey piano became a big theme of the record.” On the lead single “Hope,” creaky ambience underscores the finger-picked acoustic guitar as he croons ponderous lines a la the opening admission, “I want to feel hope when I die, so I know what I left behind.” He recalls, “I wrote that in Laurel Canyon at a friend’s house. That was my first experience writing in L.A. like that. It wrote itself pretty quickly. It takes a while for me to figure out what a song is about. It was being really honest though. That’s how I’d describe it.” “Feel You” sways between a steady beat offset by his gravelly delivery and sparse, off-time piano chords. “It takes on multiple meanings,” he reveals. “It could be like a bad relationship, or it could be something else, depending on your experience.” “Seen A Ghost” hypnotizes with its airy guitars and ethereal production as “Cigarette” lights up embers of delicate picking and resounding vocals. Barely over two minutes, the title track and closer “Ode To A Friend” leaves a lasting impression that’s both heartfelt and heartbreaking with a vocal mid-section that practically levitates on the energy of raw feeling. “When I started Old Sea Brigade, the time that followed was the best two years of my life,” he goes on. “I could tour and work on music full-time. In the middle of all that happening, one of my best friends actually committed suicide. It’s a heavy record in that respect. I came up with the lyrics right after he passed. I didn’t want a normal structure. It’s almost like an interlude to tie up the album dedicated to him. He was always such a big proponent and fan of my songs. He encouraged me to move towards a solo career. The title made sense. I felt vulnerable enough to put out music that was close to me.” That’s why it’s so easy to get close to Old Sea Brigade. Cramer opens the floodgates emotionally and forges an unbreakable connection by simply being himself. “That’s definitely something I’ve struggled with in the past. This record is my leap of faith to express music in the truest way I can. I want to keep doing that.”

$12.00
Thu, April 25, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Run River North with Common Souls
Run River North

When they first formed in 2011, LA-based band Run River North dubbed themselves Monsters Calling Home. Eight years later, the trio of Alex Hwang (guitar/vocals), Daniel Chae (guitar/vocals) and Sally Kang (keys/vocals) have returned to the name — this time as the title of their upcoming EP, “Monsters Calling Home: Part One,” out in May 2019. A celebratory effort ushering in a new era for the band, after having recently evolved from a sextet to a trio, “Monsters Calling Home: Part One” is about finding hope in transition, discovering your voice in a sea of doubt, and deciding to dance despite sadness. “It’s learning to trust your own voice regardless of whatever's happening outside of you,” Chae says. Since the departure of three founding band members in 2016, Run River North have fought to reclaim their identity and their sound. With that came a reckoning: The trio were steadfast on returning to their roots and rebranding again as Monsters Calling Home as a way to separate themselves from the personnel changes. Instead, the EP’s title — and the music within it — became the vehicle to move past the anger and hurt feelings. “Having to go through three breakups, it was a shitty time,” Hwang says. “I just stopped wanting to write songs that were angry. It’s a good emotion to go through but if that’s what you’re left with that’s not a healthy place to be. The songs on the EP are more representative of how do you find hope and how do you find joy even if you have a right to feel angry. How can you find a reason to dance even when everyone is telling you it’s not the right time to dance?” Not just an Asian-American band or a group that relies on a set sonic formula, the EP continues to expand upon the band’s prior folk-leaning backbone. On lead single “Hands Up,” the band is at their most bombastic. The result of a co-writing collaboration with Hannah Hooper and Christian Zucconi of Grouplove — the duo’s first of such sessions — “Hands Up” pairs an earworm-y chorus with a front-and-center guitar melody, a second voice among Hwang’s lead bellow. Overall, the group utilizes more drum programming, dreamy synth, and dynamic production — a more expansive sonic palette. “Monsters Calling Home: Part One” is bookended by brother-sister songs “Casina” and “Casino.” A song with roots in the band’s days as a six-piece, “Casino” was written as the group’s former members began to phase out. A wistful and rustic intro builds into a walloping chorus: “I’m stuck in this casino / not much left for me.” It’s a song which serves as catharsis when reckoning with the forces that hold us down, a song inspired by Hwang’s mother’s cancer diagnosis. “At the time it was this big middle finger to cancer or anything you felt was giving an absolute statement to people’s lives,” he says. “Casina,” on the other hand, was borne out of a late-night studio session between Chae, Kang and their producer, Miro Markie. Aiming to re-work “Casino,” “they handed me a microphone and they were like, ‘Try singing,’” Kang remembers. Her take on the song’s chorus added an air of whimsy balancing Hwang’s belt. The pair ping-pong verses and lines, creating a push-pull of dizzying tension. “I think this may be the first song that we don’t have a lead vocalist in a song,” Chae says. “When Sally wrote her part on this song it was the first time we thought this might be something. That’s the moment I can point to that was really exciting for this EP. It’s a linchpin for this EP. With the energy of “Casina” — and Kang finding her voice — in mind, Run River North move forward as a true collaborative effort unthwarted by ego and pretense. No longer held back by fear or discontent, Run River North persevered through pain and came out on the other side victorious wearing a newfound confidence. “It became about who is in the band,” Hwang says, “and now it feels like Sally, Daniel, and me being very comfortable in our own skin.”

$20.00
Fri, April 26, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Brassroots District
Brassroots District

As the outside world gets crazier, the inside groovehaus gets sweatier. Brassroots District is not a band. It's an idea. A musical collective. A respite from negativity. It's a space where freaks and businessmen, weirdos and stiffs come together for a night of unadulterated joy. To dance, sing, smoke, drink and make good, good love. For the exclusive Brassroots District Experiences (held in unmarked locations around Los Angeles), comparisons to the TV program Soul Train are misguided. Anyone who says a BRD Experience is like a 2 dimensional TV show has never experienced one. BRD Experiences are for the younger sisters and brothers of the Flower Child revolution. Officially launched 6 years after (and 400 miles from) "The Summer of Love," BRD Experiences came to be know as the haven for the rejected, the marginalized, the celebrated and the denigrated. Simply put, BRD Experiences are about "People coming together. People dreaming about a better world that could be. People singing together. Making music to change the course of humanity" As we welcome in the new year, we bid farewell to the chaos and confusion of 1972 and join hands in support of a peaceful and serene, electric and supreme 1973. Welcome to Brassroots District.

$12.00 - $15.00
Sat, April 27, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
Axel Mansoor with Peter Fenn
Axel Mansoor Single Release Party (Early Show)

Emmy-nominated singer/songwriter Axel Mansoor has lived in five countries across four continents but currently calls Los Angeles home. His music features themes of transformation and self-love, as well as an underlying message that one need not rely on others to feel validated. Authentic, bold, and honest, "Wasted My Love" marked a vibrant 2017 debut for Mansoor. The single reached #5 on Spotify’s US Viral 50 chart, received radio play from Jason Kramer of KCRW, and garnered praise from several influential music blogs. Follow up singles included “Out of My Head” and “Talk To Me”, the former of which was a Hype Machine #1 and the latter of which was accompanied by an innovative vertical music video premiered by BuzzFeed on Snapchat to over 7 million viewers. In 2018, Axel was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award in the category of Best Original Song in a Drama for his work on ABC's General Hospital. He also released his debut EP “Somerset”, which consists of five self-produced stripped-down acoustic tracks. So far in 2019, Axel has shared his latest single “The Other Side” and celebrated the release with a series of shows in New York, including a performance at the Billboard Lounge at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center. Song by song, the LA-based artist is showing listeners that it’s okay to make genuine and emotion-driven music without having to slap a label on it.

$10.00
Sun, April 28, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Telekinesis with Sontalk, The Pretty Flowers
Telekinesis

If Michael Benjamin Lerner has given us nothing more than an opportunity to nudge the word “effluxion” into the common vernacular, it is still a crowning cultural achievement. To truly appreciate this minor linguistic marvel, you need to say the word out loud—do this right now, wherever you are; it’s worth the stares. It comes from the Latin term meaning “to flow,” and pronouncing it is the closest you will ever come to feeling like you’re in an episode of Star Trek. But he has given us much more than that. The fifth full-length album he’s recorded as Telekinesis is perfect, unfussy power pop—romantic and hopeful and skittish and fresh and familiar, with hooks in all the right places. He called the album Effluxion because he too found the word a little alien when he first heard it in passing, but it also captured the spirit in which the album was made. “I looked it up and it felt really indicative of the way this record ended up working,” he says. “Everything just started kind of flowing out.” After Lerner largely traded guitars and drums for moodier synthesizers and drum machines on 2015’s Ad Infinitum—more OMD than GBV—Scottish indie-pop gods Teenage Fanclub invited Lerner on board as a touring member in 2017. In addition to this being genie-lamp wish fulfillment for a devoted acolyte (see: Telekinesis’ cover of “The Concept” and also pretty much everything Telekinesis has ever recorded), playing those songs every night with his heroes brought him back to known pleasures. “When I got home, not only was I shit-hot on guitar and keyboard, I was like, ‘God, I fucking love this music,’” Lerner says. “The one criticism I’ve gotten throughout my career is that I’m not trying to do anything inventive, and my response is always, ‘I’m not trying to do that at all.’ What you’re hearing is me regurgitating my favorite records.” Effluxion is, in the purest way, a back-to-basics album—not just in its reaffirmation of the sound and style that made Lerner an indie wunderkind a decade ago at age 22, but in the way it was created. Using the same now-discontinued MacBook microphone he used to record his earliest tracks, he holed up in the basement of his West Seattle home and put the album together piece by piece over the past two years, playing every instrument. While previous albums had former Death Cab for Cutie guitarist Chris Walla—who discovered and championed Telekinesis’ demos—and Spoon’s Jim Eno serving as producers and sounding boards and sidemen and general voices of authority and experience, Lerner wanted to do this one entirely on his own. “I think I’ve always had the knowledge, but I never had the confidence,” he says. “If something is feeling really good to me, then I don’t care if it’s lo-fi or if there’s a bad note somewhere. And that’s how I felt when I made those first records. But this is the first time I can say it’s very much my own singular vision.” Lifted by a buoyant oh-whoa chorus, “Like Nothing” catalyzed and crystallized this consciously retro process for Lerner, but the songs themselves don’t feel of any time in particular, no matter how transparent they may be about their inspiration. Raised by a Beatles-obsessed father who was a Seattle DJ for 30 years and educated as a teen at Paul McCartney’s Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts, Lerner wears his influences on his striped t-shirt sleeve; “Suburban Streetlight Drunk” proudly boosts the piano from Band on the Run’s “Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five.” Of course, there’s nothing unique about having been influenced by the Beatles; it’s about how that influence is manifested. Quiet-loud-quiet first single “Set a Course” and “Cut the Quick”—which Lerner considers one of the best songs he’s ever written—are so naturally infectious you somehow already know them. More than mere pastiche, Telekinesis songs are specific enough to paint vivid detail but universal enough to be about your life. All of which goes back to the idea of effluxion. Ten years into what will be a long career destined to be studied and mined the way he studies and mines those of the bands he loves, Michael Benjamin Lerner is as much a medium of power pop as a manufacturer. Telekinesis has internalized the science of catchiness and understands on a cellular level what makes certain kinds of songs evoke certain kinds of chemical reactions. Hooks flow in, hooks flow out.

$13.00 - $15.00
Mon, April 29, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Last Dinosaurs with Texas King
SOLD OUT! Last Dinosaurs

Arita, Japan, is an otherworldly place. An ancient village that last experienced an economic and cultural boom 300-400 years ago, Arita is now almost a ghost town, littered with old abandoned houses and overgrown with peace blossoms and Japanese maple trees. It’s a quiet, tranquil and contemplative place to be. It’s also the place where Last Dinosaurs decided to escape to record their first new material in the aftermath of the release of their acclaimed 2015 Wellness LP. It was early 2017, and the band had just spent more than 12 months on the road playing shows in support of Wellness, all the while filing away inspirations and ideas that would fill their next chapter as a band. It was a time for them to search for new inspiration, and so they packed what was essentially a mini studio (one mic, one interface, speakers, a computer and a few instruments) and travelled to the isolated town of Arita. The band’s principal songwriters, Sean and Lachlan Caskey, are of Japanese heritage, so in some ways this was a pilgrimage to find their roots, and yet once there, it dawned on them quickly that the place itself was completely foreign. “We went there to seek isolation,” explains Sean. “Somewhere very regional, very quiet. We wanted to feel like real outsiders in a place for some reason. Often, we don’t feel like we really belong in Brisbane or Australia musically (even though we love being a Brisbane band), but wanted to record somewhere where that isolation could be felt everywhere, all the time, so we could properly capture it.” It was here they penned a string of songs that would go on to form their third album, and included in that bunch was their huge new single, ‘Eleven’. ‘Eleven’ has already been earmarked as a future classic of the band, thanks to the irresistibility of the swirling guitars, boom-boom-bap drumming, and Caskey’s dynamic vocal performance recalling Discovery era Daft Punk one moment, before diving to his lower register and delivering a vintage Julian Casablancas. It’s subtly emotional, slightly jagged, and slathered in a beautifully distorted sheen. It’s initial inspiration though, came from a much more raucous environment than the serenity of Arita within which it was recorded. “We were at Splendour In The Grass a few years ago, watching The Strokes play and I was immediately inspired,” says Sean. “I went home and wrote this song on my brand-new Rickenbacker guitar, even writing my first proper guitar solo for the track, and it ended up being one of the first of a new batch of songs that informed our upcoming album.” ‘Eleven,’ stands in many ways as the perfect counterpart to the wallop that was the band’s comeback single ‘Dominos,’ which has been dominating the airwaves since the start of the year. Both songs combine to give a nod to Dino’s earlier, guitar driven sound, while reinforcing the impeccable pop song structure they’ve developed through their last six years in the spotlight. ‘Eleven,’ most notably, is a marriage of all that’s come before it – the driving guitars of In A Million Years and the assured pop dynamics of Wellness – presented with a revitalised, effervescent energy they drew from Arita. “This album has been a lot about revisiting our roots in every way,” says Sean. After hearing ‘Eleven,’ you’d be hard pressed to argue with him.

$10.00 - $12.00
Tue, April 30, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Henry Jamison with Saint Sister, Charli Adams
Henry Jamison

In an era in which the magnitude of cultural sickness is coming to light, Henry Jamison has had some time to reflect. On his second record, Gloria Duplex, the Vermont songwriter deconstructs ideas of masculinity from boyhood to adulthood and what it means to be a white, middle class male in America today. Recorded over a two-week period in New York City during January 2018, Gloria Duplex features an all-star cast including producer Thomas Bartlett (Sufjan Stevens, The National, St. Vincent,) string arranger Rob Moose (Bon Iver, Arcade Fire, Phoebe Bridgers) and mixer Patrick Dillett (Rhye, David Byrne, Glen Hansard).

$14.00
Wed, May 1, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Last Dinosaurs with Daise
SOLD OUT! Last Dinosaurs

Arita, Japan, is an otherworldly place. An ancient village that last experienced an economic and cultural boom 300-400 years ago, Arita is now almost a ghost town, littered with old abandoned houses and overgrown with peace blossoms and Japanese maple trees. It’s a quiet, tranquil and contemplative place to be. It’s also the place where Last Dinosaurs decided to escape to record their first new material in the aftermath of the release of their acclaimed 2015 Wellness LP. It was early 2017, and the band had just spent more than 12 months on the road playing shows in support of Wellness, all the while filing away inspirations and ideas that would fill their next chapter as a band. It was a time for them to search for new inspiration, and so they packed what was essentially a mini studio (one mic, one interface, speakers, a computer and a few instruments) and travelled to the isolated town of Arita. The band’s principal songwriters, Sean and Lachlan Caskey, are of Japanese heritage, so in some ways this was a pilgrimage to find their roots, and yet once there, it dawned on them quickly that the place itself was completely foreign. “We went there to seek isolation,” explains Sean. “Somewhere very regional, very quiet. We wanted to feel like real outsiders in a place for some reason. Often, we don’t feel like we really belong in Brisbane or Australia musically (even though we love being a Brisbane band), but wanted to record somewhere where that isolation could be felt everywhere, all the time, so we could properly capture it.” It was here they penned a string of songs that would go on to form their third album, and included in that bunch was their huge new single, ‘Eleven’. ‘Eleven’ has already been earmarked as a future classic of the band, thanks to the irresistibility of the swirling guitars, boom-boom-bap drumming, and Caskey’s dynamic vocal performance recalling Discovery era Daft Punk one moment, before diving to his lower register and delivering a vintage Julian Casablancas. It’s subtly emotional, slightly jagged, and slathered in a beautifully distorted sheen. It’s initial inspiration though, came from a much more raucous environment than the serenity of Arita within which it was recorded. “We were at Splendour In The Grass a few years ago, watching The Strokes play and I was immediately inspired,” says Sean. “I went home and wrote this song on my brand-new Rickenbacker guitar, even writing my first proper guitar solo for the track, and it ended up being one of the first of a new batch of songs that informed our upcoming album.” ‘Eleven,’ stands in many ways as the perfect counterpart to the wallop that was the band’s comeback single ‘Dominos,’ which has been dominating the airwaves since the start of the year. Both songs combine to give a nod to Dino’s earlier, guitar driven sound, while reinforcing the impeccable pop song structure they’ve developed through their last six years in the spotlight. ‘Eleven,’ most notably, is a marriage of all that’s come before it – the driving guitars of In A Million Years and the assured pop dynamics of Wellness – presented with a revitalised, effervescent energy they drew from Arita. “This album has been a lot about revisiting our roots in every way,” says Sean. After hearing ‘Eleven,’ you’d be hard pressed to argue with him.

$10.00 - $12.00
Fri, May 3, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PDT )
WYNDHAM
WYNDHAM Record Release Show + Special Guests

Wyndham Garnett is a multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter & producer based in Los Angeles. He is an original member of Elvis Perkins in Dearland, and a former touring member of Clap Your Hands Say Yeah. He has shared the stage with the likes of My Morning Jacket, Cold War Kids, Levon Helm, Pete Seeger, Dr. Dog, The Felice Brothers, Marco Benevento and many others. His first solo album 'Made in Voyage' was self produced and released in 2016, under the name WYNDHAM. Later that year, WYNDHAM put out an EP, 'Double You,' produced by Gus Seyffert (Beck, Black Keys). It's lead single, "Gypsy," earned a spot on Elle Music's Best New Songs of December 2016, alongside Neil Young and Childish Gambino. Garnett has collaborated closely with musician and actress Lola Kirke, producing her self-titled EP, along with her debut LP, 'Heart Head West,' which was released on Downtown Records in August 2018 and followed by a pair of Christmas songs released this past November. With his latest offering, Garnett collaborated with celebrated Producer/Engineer Sean O'Brien (Moses Sumney, Harriet) and will release April 2019.

$10.00
Sat, May 4, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PDT )
Running Touch with Yoste
Running Touch $12.00 - $15.00