The Irenic, San Diego 92104Report Issue

The Irenic, San Diego 92104


3090 Polk Ave
San Diego, California 92104
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Upcoming Shows

Sat, May 25, 2019 (3:30pm - 5:30pm PDT )
My American Heart with Dead American, Audio Karate, Matty Mullins (DJ set), For The Win, Forever Came Calling, Andy's Room, Through Being Cool DJs, Alive & Well, Elkgrove, Pop Punk Mayhem
I AM THROUGH BEING COOL FEST 2019 w/ My American Heart

(NO WAY OUT LINEUP)

$20.00 - $35.00
Fri, May 31, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
gnash with Anna Clendening
gnash

hi! my name's garrett, but a lot of people call me gnash, & i'm here to let you know you're not alone. in gnash, the g is silent, but my feelings aren't. simply put, i was raised that it's okay to have feelings, as long as you aren't afraid to talk about them. so i've chosen to do that by documenting the feelings i have in my heart in my art, & lately, more specifically, in my music. when i have a feeling, to get it off my chest, i find it's most therapeutic for me to make a song about it. what's even more redeeming is that nowadays when i release a song, an open-minded & constantly growing group of people from all around the world (who have come together over my music & call themselves the dreamers) let me know they have felt, currently feel, or will eventually feel the same. that makes us both feel better, & they help me just as much as i help them. so really, what i'm creating isn't a fan base, it's a support group & a movement, & it's filling with people who let each other know that whatever it is, however you feel, it's going to be okay. everything in life is about balance. that's the number one thing i've learned while growing up in a big city like los angeles. my first single, "i hate u you i love u," & my label, happysad, spelled :): , both, in the titles alone, tackle balancing emotional issues everyone faces daily, but most people are afraid to (or don't find the time to) discuss. so i've found the best answer to this problem is for me to do the talking so the listener can focus on thinking. my music has become a sort of emotional guide book for those who are open to experiencing life's up's & down's, but who are also committed to an overall positive outlook on life. the 3 ep's i've released, "u," "me," & "us," serve as a walk through a break up, finding yourself, & finding something new, but also the universality of that journey (& the harmony that comes from learning how to co-exist with other people in this often self-centered world we live in). eventually, i want to make a song for every feeling, & i felt this 3-part, 21-song series was a great place to start. i make music that connects with people. i think that's because my music is as real as i am. i produce & write it all in my garage, which is why my production stays simple & clean -- to my listeners & i, it's not about how it sounds, it's about what i'm saying. being honest isn't always easy (or pretty), but it's usually what's best, & honestly my favorite music has always been about the lyrics to me anyway. that's why i draw inspiration from songwriters like cisco adler, jack johnson, & ben gibbard -- they're nothing but themselves in every way. for me, music is just one way of being creative, & so far has been the easiest way to get my feelings out. i'll never be afraid to express myself, & i feel that's where my biggest strength lies. i don't see myself as just a musician, or as a songwriter, or as a producer/dj. i'm an artist in all ways, & i will use any means necessary to help people feel, & know in their hearts, minds, & souls that they are not alone. thanks for reading this & wanting to learn more about me! ...& remember, it's gonna be okay tonight, because tomorrow's just a dream away :):

$20.00 - $25.00
Fri, June 7, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
TTNG with The Kraken Quartet
TTNG

"This Town Needs Guns sound stylish, sussed and like reformed mathcore men Minus The Bear covering seminal Mancunian miserablists The Smiths. Good, in other words." -- Kerrang Oxford, England's This Town Needs Guns has always been known for walking a tightrope line between pop melody and technical precision. But, their sophomore album, 13.0.0.0.0 finds the band blurring the lines so masterfully that their intricate, spindling guitar lines and soaring pop hooks reach unforeseen apexes. And, so it's fitting that the band titled their new album after esoteric means of counting: 13.0.0.0.0 referring to the Mayan calendar's Long Count indicating the beginning (August 11, 3114 BCE) and ending (December 21, 2012) of the current creation. 13.0.0.0.0 is their first album featuring their new vocalist Henry Tremain following the amicable departure of former lead singer Stuart Smith in 2011. This lineup shows considerable growth and cohesion with Tim Collis' signature bluegrass style finger-picking electric guitar lines weaving around brother and drummer Chris Collis' stop 'n' go syncopated rhythms as Tremain's rich vocals glide across the proceedings. But it's the band's earnest songwriting that really shines herein. This Town Needs Guns have stayed true to their sound rather than chasing pop payoff like many of their contemporaries. The result is a leaner, stronger version of themselves similar to the way kindred spirits Pinback and Grizzly Bear have honed unique identities over many years. Album opener "Cat Fantastic" kicks things off at a spritely pace with an incredibly nimble clawhammer plucking guitar melody that sounds like a hybrid of Flatt & Scruggs crossed with Robert Fripp. But, it's the warmth to Tremain's voice and the song's hooky chord progression that makes it easy to forget the depth of musicianship on display throughout. Elsewhere, ethereal vocal melodies weave together with rapid-fire guitar and bass interplay on "Havoc In The Forum" and a sliced-up sounding drum pattern on "I'll Take The Minute Snake." Tremain's vocal acrobatics in "Left Aligned" reach stunning highs while slithering bass chords, fugue-like guitar notes and rollicking drums form a sturdy base. "13.0.0.0.1" perfectly closes the album with a chiming lullaby of interwoven piano and lightly plucked guitar notes. "13.0.0.0.0" will be released worldwide on LP, CD and download via Sargent House on January 22, 2013.

$15.00 - $18.00
Sat, June 8, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
together PANGEA, Vundabar with Dehd
together PANGEA + Vundabar

together PANGEA do rock ‘n’ roll as it was meant to be – raw, unpredictable, and probably dangerous, but also blazing with intelligence, emotion, and edgy experimentation. The Los Angeles-based trio made their bones as purveyors of post-millennial punk, but with their third full-length release – and Harvest Records debut – BADILLAC, they pay their debt to the supersonic 90s rock that first inspired them. The band has not sacrificed a spurt of precious energy, instead integrating nuance and dynamic momentum to songs like “No Way Out” and the undeniably badass title track. The volcanic riffs and massive melodies are matched by an equally provocative lyrical stance, with songs like “Sick Shit” and the album-closing “Where The Night Ends” casting an acerbic eye over the wreckage of the party they helped start – it’s 3am and the drunken fun has given way to sexual panic, anxiety and self-doubt. Slightly stoned but by no means slack, BADILLAC reveals together PANGEA to be both confident and surprisingly committed, their audacious ambition already impossible to contain. “It might be confusing for people, assuming we’re like this garage punk band and then hearing this record,” says singer/songwriter/guitarist William Keegan. “But we really don’t want to get trapped at all.” Keegan first started writing and recording in his Santa Clarita bedroom, his teenage tapes eventually coming to full flower with the aid of bassist Danny Bengston and drummer Erik Jimenez. Known then simply as Pangea, the band played countless beer blasts in and around CalArts, their boozy mayhem and breakneck pop hooks quickly earning them frenzied crowds throughout the Southern California DIY scene and beyond. A string of seven-inches, cassettes, and LPs – including 2011’s ace second album, LIVING DUMMY, released by Burger Records and The Smell’s Olfactory label – followed, as did gigs alongside a veritable who’s-who of like-minded rockers, including Ty Segall, Mikal Cronin, Wavves, and The Black Lips (not to mention 2013’s epic “Burgerama Caravan of Stars” US tour). BADILLAC was recorded with their longtime producer/engineer Andrew Schubert over three intensive sessions at his Tarzana studio, their roster augmented by second guitarist Cory Hanson (of the electronic pop outfit, W-H-I-T-E). While many bands in their position would have simply continued banging out the party punk, together PANGEA decided to throw a curveball at themselves and their fervent fanbase. “We wrote like 30 plus songs for this record,” Bengston says, “half of which have the same punky bubblegum vibe of our last record. Then we had this other batch of songs, a little more melancholy, a little heavier, a little darker. I think in the end we just decided to try to not make the same record twice.” “When I write, there are certain songs that I feel fit the band,” Keegan says, “and then there are songs where it doesn’t feel like they fit. At some point, I was like, maybe we should try some of the songs that don’t necessarily fit. Because I realized that they do fit – they’re just different.” Though Keegan cites such unexpected heroes as Pete Seeger and 21st Century K Records artists like Little Wings and the Microphones, he fully fesses up to BADILLAC’s most primal inspirations. Indeed, songs like “Why” and the cello-laced “No Way Out” fuse classic post punk ambivalence with fist-pumping stadium rock, their neurotic hooks, throat-rending vocals, and fat, distorted riffs hearkening back to the glory days of the alternative nation. “To me, the album is so obviously influenced by the shit that I was listening to when I was 16,” Keegan says. “Growing up in the 90s, all that stuff – Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, Weezer. It wasn’t conscious, the album just sounds like that. It feels like that music is etched in deeper that music I’ve listened to as an adult. For whatever reason, the music you listened to when you’re confused and young gets in deeper than anything you might listen to later.” BADILLAC also sees together PANGEA stepping away from their association with a much-hyped scene they believe too often revels in its own idiocy, Keegan’s wry lyrics pushing both their music and subject matter towards unsettling themes of impotence, fear, ennui, and detachment. “We think less and less about how we fit into this garage punk scene that we never even technically felt a part of,” Keegan says. “We just kinda get lumped into that. I’m not really stoked on what a lot of those bands are saying, there’s a lot of misogyny and stuff I’m not into.” Like any angst-ridden tunesmith worth his salt, Keegan also directs his gaze inwards, coming to turns with his own cynical view of relationships on songs like the mordant “Offer,” their cracked melodies and jaundiced skepticism fueled by his recent romantic struggles. “I went through a really difficult relationship where we were breaking up every three months for four years,” he says. “At the end of it, I was just like, “This is never gonna work.’ It was pretty intense and I think that informs a lot of the songs on the album. “It’s kinda funny,” he adds. “As soon as we finished this record, we broke up for good.” BADILLAC will drive together PANGEA through 2014, their imminent plans essentially consisting of touring until they drop. Nevertheless, the band finds themselves in the unprecedented position of having to ponder the future. “We’ve been discussing where the next record is gonna go,” Bengston says, “we still haven’t put our finger on it yet.” “It’s weird,” Keegan says, “because we never had to have those formal discussions, like, ‘What should the next record sound like?’ It’s always been pretty natural. Hopefully that’s what’ll end up happening again.” November 2013

$18.00 - $22.00
Fri, June 14, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
No Vacation with Okey Dokey
No Vacation

No Vacation began in early 2015, and quickly received attention for the nostalgic bedroom-pop sounds off of their debut mixtape, Amo XO , and surf-rock single, “Dræm Girl”. A few months following the release of their second mixtape, Summer Break Mixtape , No Vacation went on an indefinite hiatus. Sabrina Mai, Marisa Saunders, Nat Lee, and Harrison Spencer officially reassembled in 2017 after playing shows under various names and a few line-up changes. Since their reunion, No Vacation has released their most notable single, “Yam Yam” off of their newest EP, titled Intermission. As they transition out of San Francisco, No Vacation will bring the novice “dreamy bedroom-pop” sounds of Intermission to Brooklyn.

$13.00 - $15.00
Wed, June 19, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
Pup with Ratboys, Beach Bunny
Pup

PUP (abbreviation for Pathetic Use of Potential) is a Canadian indie/punk rock band formed in Toronto, Ontario in 2013, originally under the name Topanga.

$20.00
Sun, June 23, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
Remo Drive with Slow Pulp, Heart to Gold
Remo Drive

Dubbing your debut full-length Greatest Hits might be a bit of a misnomer—or, at worst, signs of a serious superiority complex—but there’s no bravado when it comes to REMO DRIVE. Instead, the Minnesota-based duo’s first album for Epitaph Records serves as the pinnacle of their four-plus years as a band up until now. Brothers Erik and Stephen Paulson formed Remo Drive in high school in 2013, inspired by “older kids who smoked weed and listened to Title Fight.” The pair of wide-eye musicians would find their legs in the emo world, but the songs on Greatest Hits—enveloped in themes of suburban malaise and self-reflection—shape-shift throughout all aspects of alternative rock, paying tribute not only to Midwestern emo heavyweights like American Football and The Promise Ring, but also to ’90s grunge and classic rock, among others. “It’s always going to be about loud guitars and big drums,” Erik Paulson says of Remo Drive’s sound. “The best thing for us to do is not worry so much about aesthetic and focus on whatever feels natural with the overarching idea of being a rock ’n’ roll band.” That innate honesty permeates every area of the band’s frenetic, spazzy music, from Erik’s lyrics (“I just want to be as honest and straight to the point as possible rather than trying to appear smarter than I actually am”) to the charming DIY video for “Yer Killing Me” that features the band sprinting down the streets of their hometown, instruments and all. It’s like Remo Drive—unlike many bands under their same genre umbrella—haven’t forgotten that writing and playing music is supposed to be fun. “We try to do things with a lot of energy and gusto,” Paulson says. “I think people can tell that we care a lot. I think our best quality is that we care.” But at the same time, the Paulson brothers share a deep passion and desire for improvement. Erik is 20, Stephen 22; they’ve got their entire musical lives ahead of them. So while the exuberance and irreverence stands as a hallmark of the music they make now, deep down they’re driven to continue progressing as musicians and songwriters. “Intentionally not wanting to do better is dumb,” Erik says. “There was a thing for a while where emo bands didn’t try that hard. We’re trying to bring back some of the technique with it. If someone’s doing your taxes, you’d hope they know what they’re doing. If I’m making music, I think people listening want me to know what I’m doing.” So while Greatest Hits serves as the perfect entryway to Remo Drive’s particular brand of rock, it’s ultimately a stepping stone to the Paulsons’ next evolution. But no matter how much things change, the non-negotiable aspects of Remo Drive that have turned heads until now are definitely not going to change. “I feel like we don’t really have a voice,” Erik says. “We’re always going to end up being different every single album. Our tastes change so much. We’re not too concerned about pleasing any one group of people. The things that will be consistent are the energy and the passion. As long as it sounds awesome to us and the songs are good enough, it’ll be Remo Drive.” XX Expect new music from Remo Drive soon.

$16.00 - $20.00
Wed, July 3, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
Ceremony, Sheer Mag
Ceremony, Sheer Mag

Hardcore punk band from Rohnert Park, California,, USA.

$15.00 - $18.00
Wed, August 7, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm PDT )
Weyes Blood
Weyes Blood

The phantom zone, the parallax, the upside down -- there is a rich cultural history of exploring in-between places. Through her latest, Titanic Rising (out April 5, 2019 on Sub Pop Records), Weyes Blood (a.k.a. Natalie Mering) has, too, designed her own universe to soulfully navigate life’s mysteries. Maneuvering through a space-time continuum, she intriguingly plays the role of melodic, sometimes melancholic, anthropologist. Tellingly, Mering classifies Titanic Rising as the Kinks meet WWII or Bob Seger meets Enya. The latter captures the album’s willful expansiveness (“You can tell there’s not a guy pulling the strings in Enya’s studio,” she notes, admiringly). The former relays her imperative to connect with listeners. “The clarity of Bob Seger is unmistakable. I’m a big fan of conversational songwriting,” she adds. “I just try to do that in a way that uses abstract imagery as well.” “An album is like a Rubik’s Cube,” she says. “Sometimes you get all the dimensions -- the lyrics, the melody, the production -- to line up. I try to be futuristic and ancient at once, which is a difficult alchemy. It’s taken a lot of different tries to get it right.” As concept-album as it may sound, it’s also a devoted exercise in realism, albeit occasionally magical. Here, the throwback-cinema grandeur of “A Lot’s Gonna Change” gracefully coexists with the otherworldly title track, an ominous instrumental. Titanic Rising, written and recorded during the first half of 2018, is the culmination of three albums and years of touring: stronger chops and ballsier decisions. It’s an achievement in transcendent vocals and levitating arrangements -- one she could reach only by flying under the radar for so many years. “I used to want to belong,” says the L.A. based musician. “I realized I had to forge my own path. Nobody was going to do that for me. That was liberating. I became a Joan of Arc solo musician.” The Weyes Blood frontwoman grew up singing in gospel and madrigal choirs. “Classical and Renaissance music really influenced me,” says Mering, who first picked up a guitar at age 8. (Listen closely to Titanic Rising, and you’ll also hear the jazz of Hoagy Carmichael mingle with the artful mysticism of Alejandro Jodorowsky and the monomyth of scholar Joseph Campbell.) “Something to Believe,” a confessional that makes judicious use of the slide guitar, touches on that cosmological upbringing. “Belief is something all humans need. Shared myths are part of our psychology and survival,” she says. “Now we have a weird mishmash of capitalism and movies and science. There have been moments where I felt very existential and lost.” As a kid, she filled that void with Titanic. (Yes, the movie.) “It was engineered for little girls and had its own mythology,” she explains. Mering also noticed that the blockbuster romance actually offered a story about loss born of man’s hubris. “It’s so symbolic that the Titanic would crash into an iceberg, and now that iceberg is melting, sinking civilization.” Today, this hubris also extends to the relentless adoption of technology, at the expense of both happiness and attention spans. The track “Movies” marks another Titanic-related epiphany, “that movies had been brainwashing people and their ideas about romantic love.” To that end, Mering has become an expert at deconstructing intimacy. Sweeping and string-laden, “Andromeda” seems engineered to fibrillate hearts. “It’s about losing your interest in trying to be in love,” she says. “Everybody is their own galaxy, their own separate entity. There is a feeling of needing to be saved, and that’s a lot to ask of people.” Its companion track, “Everyday,” “is about the chaos of modern dating,” she says, “the idea of sailing off onto your ships to nowhere to deal with all your baggage.” But Weyes Blood isn’t one to stew. Her observations play out in an ethereal saunter: far more meditative than cynical. “I experience reality on a slower, more hypnotic level,” she says. “I’m a more contemplative kind of writer.” To Mering, listening and thinking are concurrent experiences. “There are complicated influences mixed in with more relatable nostalgic melodies,” she says. “In my mind my music feels so big, a true production. I’m not a huge, popular artist, but I feel like one when I’m in the studio. But it’s never taking away from the music. I’m just making a bigger space for myself.”

$15.00 - $18.00
Sun, August 18, 2019 (7:00pm - 9:00pm PDT )
Hawthorne Heights, Emery with Oh, Sleeper
Hawthorne Heights, Emery

Emo-punk band from Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A. Formed in 2001 as A Day In The Life, the band soon went through some changes in lineup and musical direction, which led also to a name change. They released their debut album, "The Silence In Black And White", in 2004 on Victory Records. On November 24th, 2007, Casey Calvert died in his sleep while being on tour with the band. Lineup: Casey Calvert (deceased) - guitar, backing vocals Chris "Poppy" Popadak - drums Mark McMillon - vocals, guitar Matt Ridenour - bass JT Woodruff - vocals, guitar

$20 adv/$25 day of show
Mon, August 19, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Bad Books with Brother Bird
Bad Books

Bad Books is a collaboration between singer/songwriter Kevin Devine and Andy Hull of Manchester Orchestra.

$22.00 - $26.00
Wed, August 21, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Snail Mail
Snail Mail

Snail Mail is the Baltimore based indie rock solo project of 17 year old, Lindsey Jordan. She released a six song EP titled, “Habit,” on DC punks Priests’ Sister Polygon Records in July of 2016. The record features a full band with Shawn Durham on drums and Ryan Vieira on bass. In their “Best New Track” review for the EPs opening track “Thinning”, Pitchfork describes Jordan as possessing a voice that “sounds like it’s coming from a distance, perfect for a song with lines about wanting to lie face down on the floor for a whole year and the triumph of wasting time”. In addition to her standout vocal abilities, Jordan is a classically trained guitarist of twelve years and experiments often with various guitar tunings and techniques in order to generate Snail Mail’s unique sound.

$18.00 - $20.00
Mon, September 30, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm PDT )
Still Woozy
Still Woozy - show has been moved to Music Box - all tickets will be honored.

Still Woozy is the solo project of Sven Gamsky. He writes, records, and produces everything in his garage, for now at least. He hopes to eventually move his studio to a room with windows. The music he makes is inspired by anything that's ever stuck with him, and of course, the vast internet, which has been one of his closest friends and greatest nemesis's. He seeks to combine electronic elements with acoustic sounds to create music that feels both familiar and foreign, but that ultimately helps people be a little more intimate and vulnerable with the ones they love.

$18.00 - $20.00