Lost Lake Lounge, Denver 80206Report Issue

Lost Lake Lounge, Denver 80206


3602 E Colfax Ave
Denver, Colorado 80206
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Today's Shows

Wed, June 26, 2019 (7:30pm - 9:30pm MDT )
Jet Black Alley Cat with Hate Drugs, Ten Miles South, Walking With Bikes
Jet Black Alley Cat $10 - $12

Upcoming Shows

Thu, June 27, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm MDT )
Prxima Parada
Próxima Parada

Próxima Parada blends soulful melody and hard-hitting rhythm into a sound distinctly their own, groovy and uplifting. Vulfpeck, D'Angelo, and Lake Street Dive have been inspirations, but so have classic artists like Ray Charles and Bob Dylan; the spirit of West African, jazz, and gospel music can't help but find its way in there too. Their music serves to: “make introspection and true human connection sexy again.” Their song, Time In A Circle, from their last album has connected to people all around the world and currently has over 1,500,000 plays on Spotify alone. Próxima Parada is releasing new music this year with even more soul and deeper grooves, and will then embark on their first U.S. tour summer 2019.

$12 - $15
Fri, June 28, 2019 (9:00pm - 11:00pm MDT )
Electric Six with Kyle Shutt
Electric Six

The Devil has always been there. He is the great outsider, the original iconoclast. He is a conniving little shit and never seems to tire of giving humanity a wedgie or a wet willie just for a laugh. The Devil is capable of taking many forms. He can exist as one being or spread out amongst many. He can present himself as an ordinary man or as a horrific cloven-hoofed beast depending on his mood. Above all else, The Devil lives to corrupt, to adulterate, to defile. Electric Six has often used The Devil as subject matter for its songs because of that last bit, the part about corruption and adulteration. That’s what Electric Six has been trying to do with its music now for quite some time!!!! We want to corrupt young women….just like The Devil!!! There’s nothing more rewarding than the seduction of a young innocent maiden, forcing her to wear demonic dresses, levitating her towards the great fiery skull and watching her eyes turn black as she gives into evil and becomes the bride of The Devil!!!! That….is why we started this band….to help women realize their potential as sexy evil maidens with eyes reflecting the utter darkness of a corrupted soul. With its fourteenth studio album Bride of the Devil, Electric Six examines the concepts of evil and corruption, humanity’s various falls from grace, the nine circles of purgatory and of course, the internet itself. Bride of the Devil opens with the thunderous opener “The Opener”, a bombastic celebration of the arena rock Electric Six never got to play. The next two numbers are textbook ear worm guitar pop numbers that deal with debilitating income inequality and nepotism (“Daddy’s Boy”) and the horrors of being forced into a pool of toxic waste by an a rabid Doberman trained to kill (“(It Gets) (A Little) Jumpy”). And then we get to the title track, a radio anthem, where it all becomes clear that The Devil is a metaphor for Russia and the United States is the young girl who is seduced, corrupted and wedded into a Satanic covenant with the beast. It’s all there in black and white. The Carrie Underwood-esque lyrics alongside a backdrop of vodka and caviar and backchannels and Seychllian bank accounts. That’s how they did it. They went after our country performers and got the rubes to feel good about being Russian assets. And still, it is the feel-good anthem of the summer. Finally, the haunting album closer “Worm In the Wood” is Electric Six at its most serious, most tender and emotional. Haunting. Effervescent. Corrupt. Jaundiced. Tired. So there you have it. Electric Six is back with its fourteenth record and it’s poppy and feel-good, as well as heavy, both sonically and lyrically. Our sound will corrupt you and enslave you as the beautiful demonic bride you know you truly are. Fraulein, take this severed hand with it’s creepy long nails from the beginning of time. To do so is truly thine destiny. Come see Electric Six on the “Russia, If You’re Listening” tour this fall and into 2019. Bride of the Devil will be released on Metropolis Records on October 5, 2018 world-wide.

$18 - $20
Sat, June 29, 2019 (9:00pm - 11:00pm MDT )
Electric Six with Kyle Shutt, Pink Fuzz
Electric Six

The Devil has always been there. He is the great outsider, the original iconoclast. He is a conniving little shit and never seems to tire of giving humanity a wedgie or a wet willie just for a laugh. The Devil is capable of taking many forms. He can exist as one being or spread out amongst many. He can present himself as an ordinary man or as a horrific cloven-hoofed beast depending on his mood. Above all else, The Devil lives to corrupt, to adulterate, to defile. Electric Six has often used The Devil as subject matter for its songs because of that last bit, the part about corruption and adulteration. That’s what Electric Six has been trying to do with its music now for quite some time!!!! We want to corrupt young women….just like The Devil!!! There’s nothing more rewarding than the seduction of a young innocent maiden, forcing her to wear demonic dresses, levitating her towards the great fiery skull and watching her eyes turn black as she gives into evil and becomes the bride of The Devil!!!! That….is why we started this band….to help women realize their potential as sexy evil maidens with eyes reflecting the utter darkness of a corrupted soul. With its fourteenth studio album Bride of the Devil, Electric Six examines the concepts of evil and corruption, humanity’s various falls from grace, the nine circles of purgatory and of course, the internet itself. Bride of the Devil opens with the thunderous opener “The Opener”, a bombastic celebration of the arena rock Electric Six never got to play. The next two numbers are textbook ear worm guitar pop numbers that deal with debilitating income inequality and nepotism (“Daddy’s Boy”) and the horrors of being forced into a pool of toxic waste by an a rabid Doberman trained to kill (“(It Gets) (A Little) Jumpy”). And then we get to the title track, a radio anthem, where it all becomes clear that The Devil is a metaphor for Russia and the United States is the young girl who is seduced, corrupted and wedded into a Satanic covenant with the beast. It’s all there in black and white. The Carrie Underwood-esque lyrics alongside a backdrop of vodka and caviar and backchannels and Seychllian bank accounts. That’s how they did it. They went after our country performers and got the rubes to feel good about being Russian assets. And still, it is the feel-good anthem of the summer. Finally, the haunting album closer “Worm In the Wood” is Electric Six at its most serious, most tender and emotional. Haunting. Effervescent. Corrupt. Jaundiced. Tired. So there you have it. Electric Six is back with its fourteenth record and it’s poppy and feel-good, as well as heavy, both sonically and lyrically. Our sound will corrupt you and enslave you as the beautiful demonic bride you know you truly are. Fraulein, take this severed hand with it’s creepy long nails from the beginning of time. To do so is truly thine destiny. Come see Electric Six on the “Russia, If You’re Listening” tour this fall and into 2019. Bride of the Devil will be released on Metropolis Records on October 5, 2018 world-wide.

$18 - $20
Sun, June 30, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm MDT )
The Center with The Born Readies, To Be Astronauts, Last Rhino
The Center

A Creative Collaboration in Coordination and Key

$10 - $12
Wed, July 3, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm MDT )
Pale Sun with Palehorse/Palerider, Random Temple
Pale Sun

Formed by members of some of Denver’s most respected bands, Pale Sun has an enviable pedigree: guitarist/vocalist Jeff Suthers from Bright Channel, Orbiteer and Moonspeed, drummer Kit Peltzel from Space Team Electra, Snake Rattle Rattle Snake and Mr. Pacman, and the return of John Rasmussen on Bass of Andy Monley & the high horses, Jocko homo, and formerly of Joshua Novak and Peter, Paul and Gary.

$10 - $12
Fri, July 5, 2019 (9:00pm - 11:00pm MDT )
Poor Moxi with Satellite Pilot, Cool Accent
Poor Moxi

Poor Moxi creates energetic and theatrical alternative rock, combining influences of surf rock, punk, and indie. Described by Colorado Punk Rock Army as "an acid trip gone very, very good," Poor Moxi blends the tight composition of alternative staples like Muse and Arctic Monkeys with indie feel-good elements of groups like Cage the Elephant and The Strokes. Simply put, the Denver-based five-piece makes music to get people moving. Poor Moxi formed in 2016, under the leadership of frontwoman Megan Maher and lead guitarist Kyle Youngman. Later in the year, the duo recruited bassist Brody Esslinger and rhythm guitarist Jalon Baxter. In early 2018, Poor Moxi added drummer Patrick Bodnar to the roster, and released their debut EP, featuring 'Tranquility' and 'Out of the Blue'. They quickly began sharing their music through energetic live performances at Denver venues such as Herman's Hideaway, The Walnut Room, and Globe Hall. In March 2019, Poor Moxi released 'Zeros' and 'American Paranoid', creating a new style for the group, with heavier riffs and driving drums.

$10 - $12
Sat, July 6, 2019 (9:00pm - 11:00pm MDT )
Kronen with Bathing Lagoon, Vapor Caves, Earthsoundluver
Kronen (EP Release)

The Denver Post - "Kronen is far from your average local band. Caleb, now a second-year doctoral student of audiology, makes the most of his educational background when composing music for the studio and stage. Knowing how human ears hear and how brains react to pitch gives Kronen unique tools to create music that bends the rules. There’s certainly a strangeness to the music, in that the melodies rarely resolve the way our brains are trained to listen to pop music. It’s a lot like jazz in the way it heads in unexpected directions, but Kato Kronen’s sharp and minimalist drumming keep the music grounded and accessible." The Boulder Weekly - "Drummer Kato Kronen’s shuffling, cat-like percussion figure yields to swelling and colliding guitar tones on “Have It All,” sounding a bit like a retro-pop song slowed to two-thirds and laced with distant, half-heard voices and reverb soaked shrouds of grey noise. “Leaves Will Fall” skitters on a stick figure mid-tempo pony ride beneath vaguely menacing harmonized lead vocals shared between the siblings, and the chill instrumental “Sapience” drifts along like a murmur on the wind, lush and diffident. Drifting amidst dark confection or shoegazer ambience, Kronen evokes as effectively as it narrates. In some ways, this EP may reveal a band who has grown into their material sufficiently that they need be less parochial in how it gets assembled in the studio." The Rooster Magazine - "Lately it seems we’re all stuck dab center in a drowning musical world of hyper-infused genres and hybrid whatchamacallits. There’s hardly any distinction from one song to the next. Lyrical inspiration seems plagued by the same themes of “love” or “growth,” and finding something different in tone is difficult, even for proficient time-wasting Internet surfers as experienced as we are. But local experimental psych-rock outfit Kronen is finding its niche in the unconventional. Lead singer and guitarist Caleb Kronen says he and his band love playing with listeners’ heads, and it all stems from his studies at CU. It’s a different approach to the saturated world of tonal excess."

$10 - $12
Sun, July 7, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm MDT )
Priests with Olivia Neutron-John
Priests

What is at stake in the seduction of Kansas? Like a gavel or hammer, the question rattles across the second LP from Washington, D.C. rock iconoclasts Priests: The Seduction of Kansas. Seduction evokes pleasure, sex. Divorced from romance, seduction is a tactic of manipulation, a ploy in the politics of persuasion. Kansas is a compass. As the journalist Thomas Frank explored in his 2004 book What’s the Matter With Kansas?, the ideological sway of Kansas has often predicted the direction in which the U.S. will move—whether leaning socialist in the 1800s or going staunchly conservative in the 1980s. “There’s something sinister about the idea of seducing a whole state,” says drummer Daniele Daniele. “You’re clearly up to something. Why would you do it?” The title—like Priests—is a moving target, probing questions about the realities and mythologies of America in 2019 without giving in to easy answers. Entering their eighth year as a band, Priests—Daniele, vocalist Katie Alice Greer, and guitarist G.L. Jaguar—remain an inspired anomaly in modern music. A band on its own label, Sister Polygon Records—jolting the greater music world with early releases by Downtown Boys, Snail Mail, Sneaks, and Gauche—they are living proof that it is still possible to work on one’s own terms, to collectively cultivate one’s own world. Bred in punk, Priests play rock’n’roll that is as intellectually sharp as it is focused on pop’s thrilling pleasure centers, that is topical without sloganeering. The high-wire physicality of their live shows, the boldness of their Barbara Kruger-invoking visual statements, their commitment to cultural, political, and aesthetic critique—it’s all made Priests one of the most exciting bands of their generation, subversive in a literal sense, doing things you would not expect. With fireworks of noise and arresting melodies both, Priests’ 2017 debut LP Nothing Feels Natural was heralded as a modern classic of “post-punk”—but Priests feels urgently present. If Nothing Feels Natural was like an album-length ode to possibility, then The Seduction of Kansas exists within the adventurous world its predecessor pried open. If Nothing was the reach and conviction of a band pushing beyond itself, willing itself into existence on its own terms, then Kansas stands boldly in the self-possessed space it carved. Its 10 pop songs are like short stories told from uncanny perspectives, full of fire and camp. They make up Priests’ most immediate and musically cohesive record, a bracing leap forward in a catalog full of them. The path was not easy. Following the amicable departure of bassist Taylor Mulitz (now leading Flasher), Priests was faced with a challenge not unlike “sawing off the fourth leg of a chair, and rebuilding it to balance on three.” The challenge was difficult, something not unexpected for an egalitarian group of strong personalities. They had to rethink the interlocking dynamic of their band. “It’s almost like the version of Priests that made Nothing Feels Natural really died; we didn’t have time to grieve about that and also had to build a Frankenstein’s monster of a new version of Priests,” Greer says. The uncertainty brought a kind of freedom. With nothing to lose, Priests took risks: leaning into a realm of greater poetic license, of surrealism, menace, and pleasure. Jaguar reimagined his guitar playing, inspired by Bowie’s Berlin trilogy and his late-1970s guitarists like Carlos Alomar, Adrian Belew, and Robert Fripp. Greer embraced lyrics “that felt intuitively fun and good” and tried to shed anxieties about being misunderstood. Daniele moved towards more easeful rhythms, contributes a spoken-word interlude, and sings three songs. Meditating on the U.S., they arrived at sinister themes, sketching out characters who acknowledge their power over others, and questioning (sometimes by virtue of ignoring) why it sometimes feels good to be bad. Priests enlisted two primary collaborators in writing, arranging, and recording The Seduction of Kansas. After playing cello, mellotron, and pedal steel guitar on Nothing Feels Natural, multi-instrumentalist Janel Leppin (Mellow Diamond, Marissa Nadler) returned to breathe air into Priests’ demos, serving as primary bassist and a fourth songwriting collaborator on The Seduction of Kansas. The band also found a kindred spirit in producer John Congleton (Angel Olsen, St. Vincent), recording for two weeks at his Elmwood Studio in Dallas. It marked the band’s first time opening up their creative work to collaborate with someone outside of their DC-based community—a decidedly less hermetic approach. Priests found a third collaborator in bassist Alexandra Tyson, who has also joined the touring band. The songwriting process found the group once again analyzing the textures and scopes of albums as aggressive as they are introspective, like Massive Attack’s Mezzanine, Portishead’s Third, and Nine Inch Nails’ Downward Spiral. Greer remains one of rock’s most evocative lyricists. The Seduction of Kansas stitches images of USA mythology—Superman and Dorothy, cowboys and Hollywood, politicians and news anchors, Pizza Hut, White Castle, Applebees, Dollar Tree, The Last Picture Show, the Koch Brothers, airplanes, cornfields, the Macy’s Day Parade, strip mall—in vivid, novelistic detail. “I am fascinated with myth-making,” Greer says of her lyrics, mentioning a pointed interest in “the manufactured mythology of Americanism,” in the stories—true, false, erased, exaggerated—our elected leaders and society tell us, the ways we “communicate our values and our national sense of self.” The filmmaker Adam Curtis—who has used some of his documentaries to “talk about how neo-conservatism has successfully seduced the American heart and mind” through righteousness, image, metaphor—was an influence. “In a macro sense, I think if we, as sociologists of our own culture and nation, try to observe and understand these symbols and mythologies that have largely informed our national sense of self, maybe it would be helpful right now, in trying to figure out what the fuck are we going to do about this awful mess we’ve made (of the country, of the world),” Greer adds. This oblique Americana feels appropriate at a perilous time in the U.S., when nothing feels logical. It is especially present on the album’s psychological thriller of a title track, which is Priests’ purest pop song to date, dark and glittering—though there is still something fantastically off about it, decadent and uneasy at once. Illustrating Kansas’ potent place in our national imagination—as well as “a chorus of whoever is trying to persuade the social consciousness of Kansas”—Greer sings brilliantly of a “bloodthirsty cherub choir” in a cornfield, of “a drawn out charismatic parody of what a country through it used to be,” beckoning that “I’m the one who loves you.” The album’s lead single, “The Seduction of Kansas” does what Priests do best: They make us think, stir us with complexity. “Jesus’ Son” and “I’m Clean,” both singles, do the same. They feature dark, complicated protagonists—like descendents of Kathy Acker tales—and explore the reality that one can (and often does) swing wildly between the poles of oppression and domination. Amid the vicious, cool air of “I’m Clean,” Daniele’s narrator is a murderess who emerges from a societally-induced period of dissociative behavior to seek revenge and fulfill her fantasies. On the sardonic, Lou Reed-invoking “Jesus’ Son,” Greer presents another unsavory character—a man “who thinks he is special enough to justify doing something selfish and awful,” who proclaims “I’m young and dumb and full of cum… I think I want to hurt someone.” Priests see a connection between these evil personalities and the “obnoxious, unwarranted confidence” of “American swagger.” Elsewhere on The Seduction of Kansas, Priests’ buoyant sound boils with truths about the perverse tyranny of history. “Texas Instruments” (inspired by David Byrne’s True Stories) and “Good Time Charlie” (inspired by Charlie Wilson’s War) meditate on the violence of colonialism. The breezy “68 Screen,” sung by Daniele, is about feeling tokenized, while the spectral three-part harmonies on “Ice Cream” muse on the sweet taste of anger unleashed. “YouTube Sartre” sprung from a quiet moment, staring at the philosopher on screen: “There’s no way to overthrow the bourgeoisie/Except tossing a hand grenade into your society,” Greer sings. And the riffy closing banger “Control Freak” is like Priests’ insurrectionary Bodies era, but better—a grotesque, funhouse depiction of a power-tripping person at war with the two sides of themselves. While Priests mention, as usual, an exciting array of references—from the Chris Kraus essay “Pay Attention” and the Eileen Myles anthology The New Fuck You to The Twilight Zone—they hesitate to delineate it all. Greer sees that as a pro-art gesture. “I believe very deeply in the healing, sustaining, and transformative power of art, both on a personal and societal level,” she says. “It is essential to our wellbeing, and it is constantly under attack in so many big and small ways. These days, people are trying to justify the utility of art by explaining that it’s educational, or teaching morals or values. People want to pick apart art and media and figure out if it is saying something Important or if it is Problematic and deserves to be Cancelled. In the USA we don’t have a public education system we can be proud of, we raise people to be obedient rather than think critically. As a result, we put this bizarre expectation on our media, entertainment, and art to educate us, and sometimes we even decide that if art isn’t performing this task, it isn’t really worthwhile. That’s a horribly anti-art attitude to take; I’m super against it. I tried to keep that central to my contributions to this album.” Without offering a mandate in either direction, The Seduction of Kansas asks us to consider these stakes, to consider the consequences of a binary. In her iconic essay Against Interpretation, the cultural critic Susan Sontag wrote, “In place of a hermeneutics we need an erotics of art.” It’s a line that has informed the aesthetic vocabulary of Priests, who are not handing out answers but still suggest a profound one: In the daily crisis, we need to think our way through. “Art is meant to be incendiary, meant to make you feel and see and enrich your otherwise tepid human existence,” Greer says. “It’s been fun to bring that sensibility to Priests more, to write songs about possibly awful people doing questionable things, to adorn a song with enticing baubles that don’t explain themselves... but, I hope, will seduce the listener closer.”

$15
Wed, July 10, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm MDT )
ings with Rose Droll
ings

Inge Chiles is a guitarist and composer now living in Seattle. Her heart is overflowing with sentiment. Current live ensemble of celestial nerd-beings: Drums- Christopher Icasiano (Poor Moon, Bad Luck) Bass- Kelsey Mines

$10 - $14
Thu, July 11, 2019 (8:00pm - 10:00pm MDT )
Gypsy Temple, EverIgnite with Substitute Creature, Water Aerobics
Gypsy Temple, EverIgnite

Gypsy Temple is a new American Alt-Rock band formed in Seattle, Washington. Their debut album King Youngblood is a vigorous and efficacious sign that rock and roll continues to be a vibrant musical medium of expression for young people. The album is poised to be a historically important piece of musical work of lead vocalist and principal writer Cameron Miles-Lavi-Jones who delivers an album well beyond his 20 years. Gypsy Temple’s band members are all freshly out of their teens and the ambition and execution of the band’s thoughtful, dynamic songs evoke the days of stadium artists like Soundgarden, infused with the underground soul and speed of Bad Brains, and playing fully accessible anthems not far from the topical and existential anthems of Gang of Youths out of Australia. King Youngblood is a lyrical and musical voice to ignite the upcoming generation of positive-thinking rock and pop fans.

$10 - $12
Fri, July 12, 2019 (9:00pm - 11:00pm MDT )
Copper Leaf with Automatic Iris
Copper Leaf (Album Release)

Copper Leaf is a Denver-area indie rock band led by Sawyer Bernath. He writes songs that are often bleak, occasionally redemptive, and usually about memory, aimlessness, and/or girls. Sawyer is joined by Liz Berube, Eric Dorr, Tyler Masterson, and Jake Hyman. This is a project about contrasts: Loud vs soft, warm vs cool, sparse vs lush. From finger-picked acoustic guitar to noisy instrumentals; bare vocals to four-part harmony. Copper Leaf wants to make you feel feelings and have fun doing it. Their music has been compared to that of Iron & Wine, Sufjan Stevens, and Fleet Foxes.

$10 - $12